Two years of Abbott Government – Scorecard

Chris Mawn Media Release

Summary Results:

 Ranked in order of change between 2014 and 2015  

2015 

amongst

2014

Sept

2013

Dec

Everyone Labor Supporters Coalition Supporters Rated by (how well known) Everyone Everyone
Defence Kevin Andrews*

47.7

35.7 60.0 63.0 37.5

42.9

Education Christopher Pyne

42.0

27.0 57.2 77.0 36.0

34.6

Employment Eric Abetz

40.9

27.9 54.5 68.0 36.6

39.6

Treasurer Joe Hockey

35.9

23.3 49.4 96.0 32.2

46.9

Attorney-Gen. & the Arts George Brandis

43.2

29.9 56.8 65.0 39.0

42.5

Small Business Bruce Billson

47.4

35.3 60.2 51.0 42.9

44.1

Industry Ian Macfarlane

47.7

36.5 59.4 56.0 43.8

42.9

Finance Mathias Cormann

44.2

29.8 59.3 57.0 40.8

45.2

Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop

62.0

49.4 75.5 93.0 57.6

45.0

Indigenous Affairs Nigel Scullion

47.4

37.3 57.7 49.0 44.4

46.7

Trade & Investment Andrew Robb

47.9

34.5 61.1 56.0 45.0

44.7

Dep. PM &  Infrastructure & Reg. Development Warren Truss

45.0

33.3 56.7 66.0 42.6

43.3

Environment Greg Hunt

41.5

26.9 56.9 60.0 39.5

39.7

Social Services Scott Morrison*

46.9

30.4 63.5 69.0 44.7

38.5

Communications Malcolm Turnbull

52.7

44.3 61.8 84.0 51.1

50.6

Immig. & Border Protect. Peter Dutton*

44.5

29.6 59.8 70.0 43.8

46.7

Agriculture Barnaby Joyce

47.6

35.5 59.9 76.0 47.1

45.9

Minster for Health & Sport Sussan Ley (new)*

48.3

37.6 59.3 54.0

48.4

Prime Minister Tony Abbott

36.7

20.2 55.1 98.0 39.1

41.5

* Changed portfolio since prior survey

Ratings scores were applied as follows: Excellent 100, Good 75, Average 50, Poor 25 and Terrible 0. People who did not know the minister or enough about their performance were excluded from the rating calculations. The proportion of people who did rate each minster is shown in the summary results table.

The ‘Rated by’ column shows the proportion of all voters who felt that they knew enough about each minister to give them a score. This effectively measures how well known each minister is.

NB: the sample size for the ratings varies according to the proportion of people that could rate each minster. Hence, if 80% of people could rate a particular minister, the sample size is approximately 800 (80% of 1,000). The rating amongst, say, Labor voters, will also be proportionately smaller (46% of 80% makes a sample size of 368).

The survey also asked which party the voters had voted for in the House of Representatives (lower house) in the September Federal election, and who they would vote for if there was an election tomorrow. The results below have been summarised to a two party preferred result:

House of Reps Actual 2013 Federal Election Results Voting preference December 2013 Voting preference September 2014 Voting preference September 2015
Labor 46.5% 48% 55% 53%
Coalition 53.5% 52% 45% 47%